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, mexico, all the judicial foreign policy issues and we've moved our agenda and increasingly focusing on things domestic and what we want to do is a report on education. we don't want to repeat what everyone else has done but look at education through the prism and filter of national security and ask the question what is the relationship between the challenges of k-12 education and national security of the united states? it didn't turn out to be a terribly hard sell. she knew i had her at that point but didn't take a follow-up phone call. she was there. shea and joel cochaired the task force report, our version of the commission and the whole idea was people with disparate backgrounds, educators and national security and people don't come together in the same space and the essentially say -- raise the question about the relationship between the educational challenges we face and the national security challenges we face, to recast this issue, refrain this issue for a broader -- beyond do over. the fact that you are here reflects the fact that you are here at the risk of being redundant
for international peace. we believe that our global economic interests and our foreign policy values are closely tied together. they should be closely tied together. and that's why we urge our colleagues to seize this opportunity that russia's succession to the world trade organization presents for both job creation and our ability to bind russia to a rule-based system of trade and dispute resolution. granting russia permanent normal trade relations is as much in our interest as it is in theirs. frankly, that's what ought to guide the choices that we make in the senate. the up side of this policy is clear on an international landscape. it is one that really offers this kind of what i would call, frankly, a kind of one-sided trade deal, one that promises billions of dollars in new u.s. exports and thousands of new jobs in america that is certainly in our interest. russia is today the world's seventh-largest economy. having officially joined the w.t.o. on august 22, russia is now required by its membership in the w.t.o. to lower tariffs and to open up to new imports. that sudden jump in market acc
occasional disagreements on the conduct of foreign policy but i think it's been very rare that we have seen differently our views of how the department of defense should undertake its responsibilities. i'd also like to, as the subcommittee chair of the personnel subcommittee, i'd like to express my appreciation to our staff for all the work that they have done on this bill and the others. gary lelee, john clark, bri fire and jennifer knowles. they have been always accessible, extremely professional. it's been a great privilege to work with them. and i'd like a special moment of privilege here to recognize gordon peterson, who has been my military assistant through my time in the united states senate. gordon peterson and i graduated from the naval academy in the same year. he was a very fine and respected athlete at the naval academy. he went on to become a helicopter pilot in combat in vietnam. he gave our country 30 years of distinguished service as a naval officer. later was the editor-in-chief of "seapower" magazine, was special assistant to the commandant of the coast guard, and has bee
article in foreign policy recently. has been was a china adviser to mitt romney. he now heads the university of chicago. but he basically wrote about the sort of two chinas or to the ages. he said there's sort of a doctor jekyll and mr. hide that's evolving to a doctor jekyll, which is the nicer of the two is the economic issue. the dr. height is the strategic asia, is the security agent. if you look at the economic asia there's heavy amounts of interdependence, everybody is investigating each other. $19 billion in regional trade which includes india. if you look at the security asia, national entity, orders dispute, historical grievances just are driving things apart and you're seeing real impact on these. in the has its own problems in the region across china region across china. region across chandigarh on the border dispute. if you look at this is something that you want to be deeply engaged in or do you look at this is basically something that you can ride along and freeload and let america and canada and japan handled? >> steve, your question -- >> i'm and freeload, by t
. they came up in every debate. even foreign policy debate. and so we think that the american people are on the side of the president and democrats. that is not to say -- [inaudible] we want to remind everyone that there's already been a trillion dollars, over a trillion dollars in spending cuts. and so that is a significant part of this debate, because it happened last year. but just because washington has a short memory doesn't mean we all should have one. and that there's already been sacrifice on behalf of through those discretionary cuts. we are particularly excited doing a lot of work on the fiscal cliff. we talked about medical savings through the programs, address rising national expenditure. will have more to say on taxes, but we are ecstatic to have senator durbin here today who has played such a fundamental role over the last several years. been part of literally every negotiation that has taken place. he still an optimist, so i think that is a sign of progress. he has had a long history of being a champion and advocate for the middle class. he has carried that advocacy in
of its name will have a tough time getting to third. >> emily cadei is a foreign-policy writer for cq, congressional quarterly. you can read her work at rollcall.com and follow her on twitter@emily cadei. thanks. >> guest: absolutely. >> for the first time, bradley melling's attorney spoke out publicly on his client. manning is accused of leaking classified documents on wikileaks. manny's pretrial hearing is underway. this is a half-hour. [cheers and applause] >> thank you. thank you. well, i really appreciate the turnout here and especially the turnout by the press. thank you for that. [applause] as many of you know, i have not participated any public events before today. i also avoid any interviews with the media. it was and still is my belief that bradley manning deserves an attorney that is focused on what is happening in the courtroom and only what is happening in the courtroom. that is why i have chosen not to do the interviews. but today however marks a milestone and is actually supposed to be really to the motions hearing that we were going through and it would mark the end of
respect to the memory of former >>> the defense and foreign policy writer for congressional quarterly. the senate has been in the holding pattern on the annual defense authorization bill that they finally found a way to start consideration of amendments. what broke the jam? >> rand paul had a desire to bring an amendment that would have applied the sixth amendment rights to the citizens who been taken in the war on chair on the u.s. homeland, and as a result, he was concerned he wouldn't get time. senator mccain was the ranking member on the senate armed services committee and managed the bill assured him he wouldn't try to block rand paul's amendment. ultimately, senator dianne feinstein brought an amendment that senator paul favors that would restrict or place some restrictions on the types of reasons that you could arrest an american citizen to not hold them indefinitely and so on, so forth. that amendment was approved. >> there were several other amendments to the bill. can you point those out and tell the outcome? >> typically the iran sanctions amendment that was approved specif
our foreign policy. the chair and i both have worked for several years now trying to get the law of the sea treaty into place. it's been bouncing around for decades. but it should be more than what they call consultation. every time we talk to the executive branch -- and i am a former member of the executive branch; i spent four years in the pentagon in the reagan administration -- they say that they have consulted and the definition of a consultation should be the secretary of state calling the chairman of the foreign relations committee or the secretary of defense calling the chairman of the armed services committee or coming over for a meeting. that is not the level of discussion and involvement that the united states congress should have when we are talking about long-term commitments with countries such as afghanistan and iraq. so this amendment is not draconian. it is very sensible. it basically says that in the situation where we have entered into this proposed relationship with afghanistan, that the key committees over here in the united states congress should have 30 day
security and foreign affairs to budget policy, he dug into pressing and often prickly issues and made a difference. well after his retirement from this body, a voluntary retirement, he continued to serve the country he loved so well. before the attacks on our nation on september 11, 2001, he and former senator garry hart headed a national advisory panel investigating the threat of international terrorism. the sobering conclusions they reached about our susceptability to terrorist attacks were prescient but largely forgotten until 9/11. so when i was asked to serve on the advisory board at the warren b. cente warren center in new hampshire, of course i was pleased to accept. and his legacy will be reflected well at the rudman center, just as his legacy of service and accomplishment will continue to be reflected, appreciated in this body. madam president, i say this -- it seems perfectly a ppropriate that the distinguished senior senator from new hampshire is presiding. but the senate and the nation for warren rudman's service. madam president, i ask unanimous consent that rosscummings
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9